KIDS COUNT – NYS

Data Books and Special Reports

NYS Touchstones/KIDS COUNT Data Books

NYS 2013 Touchstones/KIDS COUNT Data Book

2013 Touchstones/KIDS COUNT Data Book BadgeThis year's edition of the Data Book uses the Touchstones framework to present a wide range of information related to six key areas of child well-being through the lens of diversity. We have gathered data that highlight racial and ethnic differences as well as the impact of these differences on children's healthy growth and development.

NYS 2012 Touchstones/KIDS COUNT Data Book

2012KCDBBadge.jpgThe theme of the 2012 NYS Touchstones/KIDS COUNT Data Book is all data are local. This data book is very different from previous editions, in that it has incorporated county subdivision data within a map for every county in New York State combining data about children living in poverty along with community resources that support healthy development (e.g., locations of WIC, Early Head Start and Head Start programs, etc.). This new visualization can be used as a tool to more accurately depict our communities; educate fellow New Yorkers about the important issues that are impacting the daily lives of children; and guide our conversations and decisions around child well-being.

Additional county-specific data are provided with each county map, including a pie chart with age group distributions from the 2010 U.S. Census. Individual two-page county reports are available for download below.

View a County Report from the 2012 Data Book

For annual county- and state-level data on over 300 key child well-being indicators, please visit the Council's Kids' Well-being Indicators Clearinghouse (KWIC). Also, you can view previous Touchstones/KIDS COUNT Data Books in our archive section.

NYS 2011 Touchstones/KIDS COUNT Data Book

2011DataBookBadge.jpgThe NYS 2011 Touchstones/KIDS COUNT Data Book provides a wide range of information related to six key areas of child well-being through the lens of diversity and disparity. This data book highlights disparities that impact child outcomes. By looking more closely at these data and identifying where disparities occur, we can more effectively target resources.For annual county- and state-level data on over 300 key child well-being indicators, please visit the Council's Kids' Well-being Indicators Clearinghouse (KWIC). Also, you can view previous Touchstones/KIDS COUNT Data Books in our archive section.

NYS Touchstones/KIDS COUNT Related Publications

Reading Matters - Infographic

ReadingMatters2.gifWe know children who are proficient readers by the end of third grade are more likely to graduate from high school and to be economically successful in adulthood. The Council on Children and Families produced this infographic highlighting reading proficiency in New York State.

Risk of Chronic Absenteeism Among
New York Students

Absenteeism.gifCurrent and proposed policies that require rigorous curricula, high quality instruction and a higher age for when students are able to leave school are grounded in a basic assumption that children are actually present in school and able to benefit from such policies. Yet, a look at chronic absenteeism in two of the state's largest school districts indicates a high percentage of students are absent for a month or more of the school year. This brief examines key student outcomes and school characteristics by schools' level of risk for chronic absenteeism. The information serves as a first step in efforts to support schools and students so that prevention strategies can be provided early on, at a point in time when they are most likely to succeed. View Chronic Absenteeism Brief.

Kinship Children in New York State

KinshipMoreInfo.gifKinship care is an extremely valuable alternative to traditional foster care, offering children strong familial bonds that provide them with a sense of positive identify, belonging and security. It can also pose considerable emotional, legal and financial challenges for caregivers. This brief highlights the benefits of kinship care and provides information about kinship care options in New York, financial benefits available through each option as well as information about where children and their caregivers can access supports. View Kinship Children in New York State Brief.

A Look a Child Poverty in New York State

ChildPovertyCover.jpgIt is well-established that childhood poverty can have a long-lasting, detrimental effect on child development. This report, A Look at Child Poverty in New York State, highlights the impact of childhood poverty, presents information regarding the status of child poverty in New York by child and family characteristics and, presents findings on how child poverty rates in New York change when alternative poverty measures are employed. Additionally, results are provided on the extent anti-poverty programs and policies reduce New York's child poverty rate when using the current federal poverty measure and an alternative measure that more accurately assesses family resources and expenses.

Due to large file size, you may wish to right-click and save pdf.

Children with Incarcerated Parents

CIP_Cover.jpgThis Children with Incarcerated Parents Report provides an examination of issues related to parent incarceration from the perspective of children and young adults, caregivers, and formerly incarcerated parents. The report describes experiences at the point of arrest, the disclosure of parent's incarceration, issues pertaining to parent-child communication during incarceration and family reunification.

Using Data to Build Comprehensive Systems for Infants and Families

UsingDataFacilitatorCover.jpgThe Council is pleased to present the Using Data to Build Comprehensive Systems for Infants and Families—Facilitator Guide (1.78 MB) and the Using Data to Build Comprehensive Systems for Infants and Families—Resource Guide (4.10 MB). (These Guides are presented by sections below.)

Each day community coalitions across the state work diligently to improve systems of care. In particular are the coalitions formed to address the needs of infants and families that were brought together through a partnership between the Council on Children and Families and the Early Care and Learning Council (formerly the New York State Child Care Coordinating Council). The materials presented here are designed to help the early childhood community coalitions interested in improving services for children and families to:

  • systematically review and assess the current status of systems that provide care to infants and families;
  • identify issues that could benefit from community coalition action and support; and
  • develop data-driven advocacy efforts and system improvements.

Although these materials focus on early childhood coalitions, we are confident the process outlined is applicable to other systems of care and beneficial to all community coalitions.

 NYS Early Childhood Data Report

ECReportCover.jpgThe Council is pleased to present the The NYS Early Childhood Data Report: The Health and Well-Being of New York's Youngest Children. The report provides 69 indicators on child well being in four goal areas:

  1. Healthy Children
  2. Strong Families
  3. Early Learning
  4. Coordinated Systems/Supportive Communities

Most indicators include statewide, New York City, and Rest of State data.

 The CHILD in Child Welfare and the Courts Data Book

CWCover2.gifThe Council is pleased to present the NYS Permanent Judicial Commission on Justice for Children's The CHILD in Child Welfare and the Courts Data Book in Adobe PDF format.The Council partnering with the New York State Permanent Judicial Commission on Justice for Children, NYS Office of Children and Family Services, and the Office of Court Administration, developed over 40 new child welfare and court indicators as a first step in presenting child-focused, child welfare and court data in New York State. The Commission, with funding from the Pew Charitable Trusts, is producing a limited quantity of The CHILD in Child Welfare and the Courts Data Books to introduce this effort. These indicators are also available on KWIC in the Child Welfare Profile.

This Data Book is presented by sections:

This edition is also presented in its entirety:

A Place to Call Home

PublicHousing.jpgWhen children are separated from their homes, they often are also separated from other family members, their peers, teachers and others who may provide them with a sense of support and stability. This brief, A Place to Call Home, highlights the factors that play a role in family and youth homelessness and the type of supports that can prevent or reduce the likelihood of this experience.

NYS Touchstones/KIDS COUNT Special Reports

Identifying High-Needs Communities in New York State

Young children's well-being can be compromised by a range of risk factors associated with children, their families, the quality of schools they attend and their communities; it is also well-established that these risks can be offset by early supports to children and families.  Therefore, identifying communities where young children are disproportionately exposed to factors that can compromise their development enables us to align and mobilize resources that promote their well-being and offset factors that place them at risk.  This research brief describes the method used to identify high need communities in New York state, with particular emphasis on children from birth to age 5 years.

Nourishing New York's Children

Proper nutrition, the building blocks for children's health, cognitive development and overall growth, is essential for children's healthy development.  This brief describes the status of food insecurity in New York, provides an overview of programs intended to target this issue and presents county-level data on many of the factors that contribute to inadequate nourishment.

Adverse Childhood Experiences Among New York Adults

Optimal child well-being is related to our ability to provide children with safe, nurturing, stable environments that support their development of sound cognitive, emotional and social skills. However, their development can be jeopardized when individuals are exposed to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). This brief describes the types of adverse childhood events experienced by adults in New York state as well as their peer recovery and medical services.

Children with Incarcerated Parents

This report provides an examination of issues related to parent incarceration from the perspective of children and young adults, caregivers, and formerly incarcerated parents. The report describes experiences at the point of arrest, the disclosure of parent's incarceration, issues pertaining to parent-child communication during incarceration and family reunification.

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

It is estimated that nationally one child in 110 has an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This research brief highlights factors associated with ASD, challenges with early diagnosis, and provides an overview of children in New York who are identified as having an ASD.

Decision Markers in the Juvenile Justice System—Opportunities for Support and Intervention

The juvenile justice system is the means we use to respond to children who are in conflict with the law. The overarching goals of the system are to ensure community safety and make youth accountable for their actions. Equally important is the fundamental need to build youth competencies in order to reduce the possibility that youth will develop or increase behaviors that may move them further into the juvenile justice system. Given these multiple goals, an effective juvenile justice system is one in which there is a skillful balance between reparation and redemption.This brief focuses on the decision point when youth come into contact with probation departments and alternative strategies that could decrease youths' further penetration into the juvenile justice system.

A Conversation with Immigrant Mothers About Early Learning Programs: Benefits, Barriers & Work to be Done

Approximately one in four of New York's four-year-old children lives with an immigrant mother and half of these children live at or below the 200 percent poverty level despite the fact that most of these mothers and their spouses are in the workforce. Fortunately, a widely recognized means to equalize opportunities for children in poverty is participation in early learning programs. The purposes of the focus groups were to learn about immigrant mothers' decision to either enroll or not enroll their children in early learning programs and gain a better understanding of the perceived barriers and benefits of such programs. Of particular interest was the identification of cultural factors that might contribute to differing enrollment rates.

A Level Playing Field for New York's Children in Immigrant Families

Early learning programs play a critical role in equalizing opportunities, particularly for children in immigrant families who are often living in poverty. This research brief reviews the early learning enrollment rates among children in immigrant families, identifies differences in enrollment by mother's country of origin and examines a series of child, family, and economic factors that influence whether children are enrolled in early learning programs.

Please visit our archive section to view previous Touchstones/KIDS COUNT Special Reports.

Annie E. Casey Foundation Reports

Creating Opportunity for Children: a two-generation approach

Badge for 2 Gen AECF ReportFor many American families, every day is a juggling act involving work, child care, school and conflicting schedules. But for low-income families, the balls are more likely to fall, and the consequences can be dire when they do. But for low-income families, the balls are more likely to fall, and the consequences can be dire when they do. A lack of reliable child care can mean fewer work hours or even a lost job. Weekly or daily shift changes require repeatedly stitching together a patchwork of care. Just getting to work is tough without dependable transportation. Download Creating Opportunity for Families: a two-generation approach to learn more.

AECF 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book

AECF 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book BadgeThe 25th edition of Casey’s annual report on child well-being — the 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book — examines how U.S. children have fared since 1990. While national and state policies have resulted in positive gains in child health and education, the Data Book notes a decline in the economic well-being of children and the communities in which they live. In addition to its retrospective analysis, the report looks at the latest data and uses 16 key indicators to rank states on child well-being.

Race for Results: Building a Path to Opportunity for All Children

Race Results Badge

Building a pathway to opportunity for all children – especially children of color – is an urgent matter. Children of color face multiple barriers to opportunity. These barriers often stem from our country's unfortunate history of discrimination that has made accessing the pathway to economic success more difficult for many families.

Read the AECF KIDS COUNT POLICY REPORT – Race for Results: Building a Path to Opportunity for All Children to learn more.  

Early Reading Data Snapshot

earlyreading-badge3-300x300.jpg

Children who are proficient readers by the end of third grade are more likely to graduate from high school and to be economically successful in adulthood. This KIDS COUNT data snapshot finds 80 percent of fourth-graders from low-income families and 66 percent of all fourth-graders are not reading at grade level. Early reading proficiency rates for the nation and each state are provided.

The First Eight Years: Giving Kids a Foundation for Lifetime Success

Father and Daughter Blowing BubblesThe report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, The First Eight Years: Giving Kids a Foundation for Lifetime Success, highlights the importance of supports for families and the lasting impact of quality early childhood programs on children as they progress through school and into adulthood. Also, view the Snapshot of New York's Youngest Children (Ages 0-5).

AECF 2013 KIDS COUNT Data Book

2013AECFBadge.jpgThe Annie E. Casey Foundation's 2013 KIDS COUNT® Data Book is now available. Using its comprehensive index to measure child well-being at the national and state level, the data book shows that children have continued to see gains in education and health.  Also, as the nation's economy recovers, America's children are seeing modest improvements in economic well-being. The KIDS COUNT index covers four categories — Economic Well-Being, Education, Health and Family and Community — each with four indicators. The Data Book presents the latest trends, starting pre-recession and ending with the most recent year of available data. Be sure to visit the newly redesigned KIDS COUNT Data Center, which also contains the most recent national, state and local data on hundreds of measures of child well-being.

AECF 2012 KIDS COUNT Youth Employment Policy Report

AECFYouthWorkBadge.jpgThe 2012 KIDS COUNT Data Book introduces a new KIDS COUNT index, which provides a detailed picture of how children are faring in the United States. In addition to ranking states on overall child well-being, the Data Book provides state rankings for four domains: Economic Well-Being, Education, Health, and Family and Community.

AECF 2012 National KIDS COUNT Data Book

2012KCDBBadgeAECF.jpgThe 2012 KIDS COUNT Data Book introduces a new KIDS COUNT index, which provides a detailed picture of how children are faring in the United States. In addition to ranking states on overall child well-being, the Data Book provides state rankings for four domains: Economic Well-Being, Education, Health, and Family and Community.

 

Stepping Up for Kids

AECFKinshipBadge.jpgThe new KIDS COUNT report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, STEPPING UP FOR KIDS, highlights the importance of kinship care and outlines how state governments and communities can help these relatives. Nationally, there are 2.7 million children cared for by extended family members and close family friends. In New York, about 153,000 children are living in this type of household, which represents about 3 percent of all children 18 years and younger in the state.

AECF 2011 National KIDS COUNT Data Book

AECF_2011KidsCountBadge.jpgThe AECF annual data book is a comprehensive resource on the status of U.S. children, featuring state-specific data on ten key indicators of child well-being. Please visit the Data Book home page to download the report and create maps, graphs, and charts at the national, state, and local level. The new mobile Data Center offers hundreds of measures of child well-being available on any smartphone: http://mobile.kidscount.org.

 AECF 2010 Special Report: Learning to Read—Reading to Learn

ReadCover.jpgAnnie E. Casey KIDS COUNT 2010 Special Report: Learning to Read—Reading to Learn. This report focuses on effective strategies for achieving grade level reading proficiency for all children, emphasizing the importance of having children be able to read by grade 3 so they can use this skill to learn to read.

Executive Summary—Learning to Read— Reading to Learn.